The new crown flocked swab detects the recovery of critically ill patients!

The new crown flocked swab detects the recovery of critically ill patients!
2021-02-23

The new crown flocked swab detects the recovery of critically ill patients! Israeli anti-coronavirus new drug developers reveal experimental details

Recently, some media reported that Israel has developed a new type of drug that can be inhaled from the nose to suppress the immune storm and cure patients with severe new coronary pneumonia in just a few days. Among the 30 critically ill volunteers who participated in the first phase of clinical trials, 29 were cured after 5 days of treatment. On February 17, Nadir Arber, the inventor of the drug and a professor at Ichilov Hospital in Israel, unveiled the drug to multinational media including this newspaper through a video conference Of mystery.

Nadir Alber demonstrates the “medication” equipment in a video conference.

According to Albert, the drug is a combination of CD24 protein and Exosomes, so it was named EXO-CD24. CD24 can not only bind to the endogenous molecules (DAMPs) released by the body’s cell death to prevent DAMPs from causing further immune responses, and at the same time block the Siglec-10 receptors of immune cells, both of which reduce the effect of the immune system. Exosomes are small lipid vesicles that can shuttle proteins, RNA and other substances between cells, and they are mainly used as a means of transport for CD24. The “strong combination” of the two can effectively suppress the “immune storm” common to patients with severe new coronary disease.

The so-called “immune storm” is that the immune system of severely ill patients with new coronary pneumonia is overactivated and out of control. While eliminating the invading virus, it causes serious damage to their own tissues and organs. This is an important cause of death from new coronary pneumonia. Therefore, the role of EXO-CD24 is not to eliminate the virus directly, but to eliminate the immune storm, allowing the immune system to clear the virus more safely.

A reporter from the Science and Technology Daily learned from the video conference that in September 2020, the Israeli Ministry of Health approved EXO-CD24 to start clinical trials. The first 30 patients were all severely ill, ranging in age from 33 to 77, with an average age of 58 years, and one third of them were women. Except for one person who stopped participating in the trial because of being transferred to the intensive care unit, the remaining 29 people were cured after 5 days of treatment, and none of them had serious side effects due to the drugs.

According to the condition information published by Albert, most of the recovered patients had their blood oxygen concentration dropped to 90 to 92 before treatment with EXO-CD24, and the respiratory rate was close to 30, which was hypoxic. The reactive protein level was mostly over 100 and the highest reached 400. Above, it shows serious infection. After treatment, the patient’s blood oxygen concentration increased significantly, with more than 20 people reaching 95 or more, the respiratory rate all fell below 25, the level of reactive protein also generally decreased, and the hypoxia and infection conditions were significantly improved.

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu met with Professor Albert. Image source: Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs website

Albert said that, compared to the traditional treatment of using steroids to suppress immune storms, EXO-CD24 is directly inhaled through the trachea to the heart of immune storms-the “lungs”, using exosomal technology for low-dose local administration, which is safer High, no adverse reactions and significant effects. At the same time, it is easy to produce and low in cost. In addition, the drug may be used to treat other acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), asthma, allergic reactions, autoimmune system diseases and other problems.

It is reported that EXO-CD24 is about to enter the next stage of testing.

Source: Science and Technology Daily

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